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Japanese Meiji Period Shakudo RARE Lapel Button Fan Brooch C.1880's Aesthetic Period
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Japanese Meiji Period Shakudo RARE Lapel Button Fan Brooch C.1880's Aesthetic Period Japanese Meiji Period Shakudo RARE Lapel Button Fan Brooch C.1880's Aesthetic Period Japanese Meiji Period Shakudo RARE Lapel Button Fan Brooch C.1880's Aesthetic Period Japanese Meiji Period Shakudo RARE Lapel Button Fan Brooch C.1880's Aesthetic Period

Japanese Meiji Period Shakudo RARE Lapel Button Fan Brooch C.1880's Aesthetic Period

£325.00
Japanese Fan Brooch

An unusual find, this is a Japanese Meiji period men's lapel button in the form of a fan. So nice to get a piece of men's jewellery (but can of course be worn by either gender!)
Made in Japan for export around the 1880's it is a fabulously detailed composition featuring traditional cranes and Sakura /cherry blossom.
As ever with these pieces, the detail is amazing, look at the "ribbon" running through the top of the fan.


Victorians loved symbolism and the crane represents good fortune and longevity in Japanese culture. The Japanese refer to the crane as the “bird of happiness”. In Japanese culture, sakura or cherry blossom is seen as the embodiment of beauty and mortality and can be traced back centuries.

It is a beautifully executed piece which has great meaning and is worn in the top button hole on a jacket. The perfect size, it is subliminally understated and a wearable piece of art.  It is made from bronze and overlaid / highlighted with gold white, copper and gold coloured metal which I am assuming is silver / gold / bronze /copper / rose gold - I don't want to acid test this piece as it's so small and will almost certainly damage it. The rear has a "button" fixing which simply slips through a button hole.


Size: 3.5cm (1 3/8th")  side to side height is 2cm (3/4")

About the Japanese Meiji Period and Metal Work

During the Edo period, metalworkers were kept busy making swords, daggers, and tsubas for samurai clients. However, the metalworkers turned to other means of survival when the Restoration government prevented samurai from wearing swords. During the Meiji, metalworkers made vases, sculptures, and other decorative objects for their new clients in Japan and abroad. Japanese artists working in bronze and other metals were recognised for their excellence at the Vienna exhibition of 1873, and the later Exposition of metalwork in Nuremberg, in 1885.


M980

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We use industry standard methods for calculating stone weights and / or colour (if stated) in set jewellery using measurements, calculations and comparison. We do not remove stones from their settings to determine size or colour.

*ALL Gold and or Platinum stated precious metals that bare no stamp or hallmark are tested using a non-destructive electronic testing device. All silver is acid tested.

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